How To Handle A Jack Knife Skid

A jack knife skid is one of THE most threatening, scary situations a professional truck driver will ever find themselves in. Most truck driver training programs, do not spend sufficient time teaching trainees how to handle a jack knife skid.
I’ve been a professional truck driver for about 40 years. I have driven all over North America in all types of weather and all types of terrain.

Every driver has their own method for correcting a jack knife skid situation.

Here’s what has worked for me in my driving career.

What to Do When In a Jack Knife Skid Situation

i) Get the unit (tractor trailer) straight. This is the first thing a driver must do when in a jack knife skid situation.
As a professional driver, it’s vital to remain calm, have a cool head and focus on the matter at hand.

ii) If the trailer is kicked out to the passenger side, the best way to correct this, is to steer into the direction of the skid on the same side (steer to the right).

iii) I first take my feet off pedals, whether the clutch, the fuel and the brake.

iv) I concentrate on the steering. My focus is on straightening the truck/trailer.

v) I then attempt to slow the unit down. Some drivers will not agree with me, when I say I utilize the jake brake. It’s possible to use the jake brake on a lower setting, if the roads are excessively slippery.
I let the jake walk the engine down gradually.

vi) When I feel that I am regaining control of the truck, I will try to ‘feather the pedal’. I do not use the trailer brake to slow down when in a jack knife skid.

Then, when in control, I will slowly ease the truck and trailer over to the side of the road.
It’s important to steer gradually toward the skid. Do NOT turn the steering wheel hard into the skid. Do NOT over correct. This will help to counteract the sliding movement and help to straighten the truck and trailer on the road.

Most skids are caused by excessive speed and poor road conditions caused by bad weather. So it is important to be aware of the impending dangers when driving in foul weather.

15 Essential Winter Trucking Safety Tips

Winter trucking safety tips for truckers: driving a tractor trailer in serious winter conditions, demands a specific set of skills for all drivers, especially big rig drivers.
Too many drivers on the highways do not alter their driving skills, when driving in poor weather conditions, on snow-covered or icy roads. Good maneuvering and skid control skills are essential in poor weather.
Knowledge and implementation of proper, preventative safety skills for driving in poor conditions, can truly separate the professional drivers from the rest of the pack.
They have the smarts for making good decisions and knowing when conditions are not safe, and it’s time to ‘get off the road’.
Driving in bad weather, especially in snow and on ice, is risky due to more ‘ stop time’ required, poor visibility, poor traction and the increased unpredictability of other drivers on the road.

NHMTA Travel Alert I-95 – Starting tonight at 7:00 pm

CLOSURE OF OPEN ROAD TOLLING LANES ON I-95
TO ALLOW FOR MAINTENANCE WORK AT HAMPTON TOLLS
The New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT) announces plans to close both the northbound and southbound Open Road Toll (ORT) lanes at the Hampton Toll Plaza on Interstate 95 for winter maintenance work.
The closure is scheduled for the night of Thursday, January 11, 2018 from 7:00 pm until 5:00 am on Friday morning, January 12, 2018.

The closure is necessary in order for the removal of snow along the shoulders and against the concrete barrier. All motorists will be guided via signs and traffic cones to the non-ORT portion of the Hampton Toll Plaza where they will proceed through either dedicated E-ZPass lane or cash lanes.
Contacts:
John Corcoran, Turnpikes Bureau, 603-485-3806
Bill Boynton, Public Information Office, 603-271-6495

NHMTA Regional Declaration of Emergency

Dear Member,

The US Department of Transportation has issued a Regional Declaration of Emergency under 49 CFR 390.23. The Declaration is for 38 states and grants emergency relief from Parts 390 through 399 of Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations with some restrictions, and includes the transportation of fuel products into and rom the Affected States and jurisdictions.

Please keep a copy of this Declaration in the cab of your truck.
2017 12 30 fmcsa-regional-emergency-declaration-winter-12-30-2017

NHMTA VT Emergency Declaration Notice for Hours of Service

Dear Member,

Pursuant to 49 CFR Section 390.23 and Vermont Title 5 VSA 2101, the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles declares that an emergency exists pertaining to the delivery of home heating fuels (fuel oil, propane) within the State of Vermont. Under certain guidelines, there is an exemption for Hours of Service.

This Emergency Declaration will remain in effect through January 9, 2018 at midnight. Please be advised that this will be reviewed after seven days to determine whether the Declaration of Emergency needs to amended or rescinded at that time.

The Declaration is attached. Please keep a copy of this Declaration in the cab of your vehicle.
2017 12 26 Declaration of Emergency Notice 122617

FMCSA: Check Out Our Latest Short Video

Learn more about long stopping distances of large trucks and buses.

The Our Roads, Our Safety Partnership just released a new short video that depicts the long stopping distances that trucks and buses face, and provides tips on how passenger vehicle drivers can safely operate around these large vehicles.
For more resources

Toll Update

Dear NHMTA Membership:

Most all of you have been following the toll increase in the media.

Last week I sent an email out requesting our membership attend a hearing in Portsmouth at the public library on Monday night to help oppose the unnecessary increase. On behalf of our Association, I want to thank the following companies for taking their time to appear at the hearing and support the Association’s position in opposing the proposed toll increase of over 36 million in new revenue a year. They are: Associated Grocers of New England, Ross Express, Wal-Mart Transportation, M&S Logistics, Pinard Waste, Eagle Express/Warehousing, City Fuel, Dead River Company and R&M Freight. We would also like to recognize Rockingham Oil, Bridges Brothers and J & F Farms for their written comments.

In addition to our opposition, NH Senate President, Chuck Morse, appeared in strong opposition to this proposal. He exposed the process which was flawed. There had been no public hearing on this proposal in the previous twenty-three Governor Advisory Council on Intermodal Transportation (GACIT)meetings held throughout the state of New Hampshire this past year. Senator Morse pointed out the email that went out to the five Executive Councilors who oversee the setting of toll rates was sent out at 10:00pm the Wednesday evening, the day before Thanksgiving. The perception being there was a coordinated effort to pass a massive tax increase on to the New Hampshire citizens with no legislative oversight and in the dark of the night. Senator Morse said he would not support this effort. His comments were echoed by Senator Birdsell (Chair of the Senate Transportation Committee), Senator Avard and Senator Sanborn.

I also must point out that the Union Leader played a prominent role in exposing this attempted toll increase.

Yesterday, Governor Sununu removed the toll proposal from the Governor and Council’s agenda for today’s meeting at the request of the NH Department of Transportation. I believe there will be additional public meetings set up in each Councilor’s district. This toll proposal may show up again at a future Governor and Council meeting or it may be gone for good. If there are additional meetings we will need to show up in opposition or run the risk of facing an unnecessary toll increase.

Please remember the three Executive Councilors currently in support of this toll increase are, Councilor Russell Prescott, Andru Volinsky and Christopher C. Pappas. The two Executive Councilors opposed to the toll increase are Councilor David K. Wheeler and Joseph D. Kenney.

I also want to thank the many NHMTA members that took the time to contact their Executive Councilor to voice their opposition to this toll increase.

The removal of the toll proposal is a good step. However, it may resurface to be voted on in the future. All of this would be put to rest if Governor Sununu would say he would veto the proposal.

I will keep you updated as we learn more.

Robert J. Sculley
President
New Hampshire Motor Transport Association
P O Box 3898
Concord NH 03302
603-224-7337 Fax 603-225-9361
Like us on Facebook

NH Toll Increase


Dear NHMTA Member:

As most of you know by now, there is a proposal to raise tolls on the Turnpike system by a substantial amount. According to the New Hampshire Department of Transportation, this toll proposal will generate an additional $36 million in revenue for the “acceleration and expansion of Turnpike capital projects.” Attached is the seven-page toll proposal that was prepared by the New Hampshire Department of Transportation for your review.

Toll rates are set by the New Hampshire Executive Council, unlike the “gas tax” which is debated and voted on by the New Hampshire General Court (NH House & Senate). If the toll rate increase is approved by the executive councilors, the majority of the toll transactions in the state of New Hampshire will increase by 50%. The commercial motor vehicle rate will become twice the class-one passenger rate, which is displayed on a graph in the proposal.

Herein lies the problem: There are five executive councilors and it takes only three to approve a toll increase. Executive Councilors Papas, Volinsky, and Prescott are all in support of this massive toll increase.

If you are opposed to this increase, I am recommending the following course of action: It is extremely important that the executive councilors and the governor hear from you as soon as possible. Their contact information is found on a separate sheet, attached.

Additionally, a public hearing has been scheduled for Monday night, December 4, 2017, at 6:00 pm at the Portsmouth Public Library for the purpose of public input on this toll proposal which I hope you will attend. Here is the address of the venue:
Portsmouth Public Library
175 Parrott Ave
Portsmouth, NH 03801

Unless you are in favor of an increase in tolls, it is critically important that you show up at this meeting to voice your opposition. I am very afraid that there will be many in the room that will be in support of this proposed increase.

Please make phone calls if you can as I have found that they can be the most effective form of communication. E-mail addresses are provided if you do not have the opportunity to call.

Here are a few talking points that you can use:

The New Hampshire Turnpike system is fully funded. There is enough cash to pay for current projects.

The state raised the gas tax 4.5 cents per gallon only three years ago. This generated approximately $32 million in new funds that are dedicated for use on New Hampshire’s roads and bridges.

This is important because the toll increase proposal is intended for the state to purchase a part of the highway through Concord (between Exits 14 to north of Exit 15) making it part of the turnpike system. As part of that transaction, according to NH DOT, that would free up $180,000,000 to be used on non-turnpike system roads and bridges.

That discussion should be part of a legislative hearing with multiple opportunities for public input.
Please, let the executive councilors know of the direct-cost impact to your business on a monthly and annual basis, i.e., the expected cost increase of goods and services to your customers and the impact on your employees.

Please let me know if you plan to attend the hearing on Monday evening in Portsmouth. It would be great if you can attend. Also, please provide me with any feedback that you receive from the executive councilors.

Sincerely,

Robert J. Sculley
President
New Hampshire Motor Transport Association
P O Box 3898
Concord NH 03302
603-224-7337 Fax 603-225-9361
Like us on Facebook

2017 11 28 New Hampshire Executive Councilors

2017 11 28 Proposal for Acceleration and Expansion of Turnpike

NIGHT WORK ON I-93 BETWEEN EXITS 4 AND 5 IN LONDONDERRY

I-93 NORTHBOUND LANE CLOSURE FOR PAVEMENT MARKING

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT) announces traffic impacts for planned night work associated with the I-93 expansion between Exits 4 and 5 in Londonderry.

Weather permitting, pavement marking work for a new traffic pattern will take place during nighttime hours from Monday, November 20th into Tuesday, November 21st. The work is scheduled to be done between the hours of 8:00 pm and 5:30 am and will require the use of lane closures. Message boards and smart work zone devices will be used to notify the traveling public.

Traffic on I-93 northbound between mile markers 12.6 and 15.8 will be reduced to one lane. Motorists should remain alert while traveling through the construction zone and obey all posted signs.

This work is part of the $35 million I-93 widening and reconstruction project between Exit 4 in Derry and Exit 5 in Londonderry. The general contractor is Weaver Brothers Construction from Bow, New Hampshire.

NIGHT WORK ON I-93 NEAR EXIT 4 IN LONDONDERRY

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation announces night work is planned on I-93 northbound Londonderry, in the Exit 4 area, between mile markers 10.4 and 11.4 on Monday, September 25, 2017. Structural steel will be set for the I-93 northbound bridge over Kendall Pond Road.
This work is scheduled to be done between the hours of 8:00 pm and 6:00 am and will require the use of lane closures. Message boards and smart work zone devices will be used to notify the travelling public. This work is expected to take one night to complete, however additional nights may be required due to weather conditions.
This work is part of the final I-93 northbound and southbound mainline construction in the Exit 4 area (Derry/Londonderry), as well as the northbound and southbound on and off ramps reconstruction, the NH Route 102 reconstruction (including the construction of the NH Route 102 Bridge over I-93), and Pillsbury Road/Ash Street (including the Pillsbury Road/Ash Street Bridge over I-93).
—–