Training Reminders

IFTA Training, September 7, 2018, 10:00am – 11:00am

Pre-trip and Maintenance, September 13, 8:30am – 12:30pm

Maintenance and CSA Scores, September 24, 2018, 9:00am – 12:00pm

How to Survive a DOT Audit, September 27, 8:00am – 12:00pm

Reasonable Suspicion, September 27, 12:30pm – 3:30pm

Hazardous Materials, October 11, 8:30am- 12:30pm

CMVR Driver Refresher, October 18, 8:00am – 12:00pm

 

NHMTA Annual Meeting, December 6, 2018

Navigate to the “Events” Tab for more information and to print out registration forms.

Reminder: Break Safety Week takes place October 16 – 22, 2018

June 18, 2018

CVSA-certified enforcement personnel will conduct roadside inspections on commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) as part of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) Brake Safety Week, Sept. 16-22, in order to identify and remove CMVs with critical brake violations from our roadways and to call attention to the dangers of faulty brake systems.

Properly functioning brake systems are crucial to safe CMV operation. Brakes must be routinely inspected and carefully and consistently maintained so they operate and perform to the manufacturer’s specifications throughout the life of the vehicle. Improperly installed or poorly maintained brake systems can reduce braking efficiency, posing serious risk to public safety on our roadways.

Data and research are clear:

  • According to the U.S Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Large Truck Crash Causation (LTCC) Study, 32.7 percent of large trucks with pre-crash violations had brake problems.
  • Brake-related violations comprised the largest percentage of out-of-service vehicle violations cited during last year’s International Roadcheck.
  • The LTCC Study’s relative risk analysis indicated that large trucks involved in a crash where the braking capacity of the truck was critical were 50 percent more likely to have a brake violation than were trucks involved in crashes where the truck’s braking capacity was not critical.
  • According to the LTCC Study, of the trucks involved in brake-critical crashes, 45.5 percent had brake violations, compared with 29.9 percent of trucks involved in crashes of the same type where the braking was not relevant.
  • Results from last year’s Brake Safety Day found that 14 percent of all inspections conducted during that one-day brake safety initiative resulted in a CMV being placed out of service for brake-related violations.

Brake Safety Week aims to reduce the number of crashes caused by poorly maintained braking systems on CMVs by conducting roadside mechanical fitness inspections and removing dangerous vehicles from our roadways.

In addition to inspections and enforcement, outreach efforts by law enforcement agencies to educate drivers, mechanics, owner-operators and others on the importance of proper brake maintenance, operation and performance are integral to the success of the safety initiative.

During Brake Safety Week, inspectors will primarily conduct the North American Standard Level I Inspection, which is a 37-step procedure that includes an examination of driver operating requirements and vehicle mechanical fitness. Inspections conducted will include inspection of brake-system components to identify loose or missing parts; air or hydraulic fluid leaks; defective rotor conditions; measurement of pushrod travel; mismatched air chamber sizes across axles; air reservoir integrity and mounting; worn linings, pads, drums or rotors; required brake-system warning devices; and other brake-system components. Vehicles with defective or out-of-adjustment brakes will be placed out of service.

In addition, in the 12 jurisdictions using performance-based brake testing (PBBT) equipment, vehicle braking efficiency will be measured. PBBTs measure the cumulative brake force for the entire vehicle and divide it by the total vehicle weight to determine overall vehicle braking efficiency. The minimum braking efficiency for trucks is 43.5 percent, required by 393.52 of the U.S. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations and the CVSA North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria.

Brake Safety Week is part of the Operation Airbrake Program, sponsored by CVSA in partnership with the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators and the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

FMCSA Seeks Public Comment on Revising Current Hours-of-Service Regulations for Interstate Truck Drivers

Areas under consideration for revision include short-haul operations, adverse driving conditions, 30-minute break, and split sleeper-berth

 

 

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) today announced that it is seeking public comment on revising four specific areas of current hours-of-service (HOS) regulations, which limit the operating hours of commercial truck drivers.

 

The upcoming Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-service-advanced-notice-proposed-rulemaking, which will be published in the Federal Register, responds to widespread Congressional, industry, and citizen concerns and seeks feedback from the public to determine if HOS revisions may alleviate unnecessary burdens placed on drivers while maintaining safety on our nation’s highways and roads.  The comment period will be open for 30 days.

 

The four specific areas under consideration for revision are:

 

·       Expanding the current 100 air-mile “short-haul” exemption from 12 hours on-duty to 14 hours on-duty, in order to be consistent with the rules for long-haul truck drivers;

·       Extending the current 14-hour on-duty limitation by up to two hours when a truck driver encounters adverse driving conditions;

·       Revising the current mandatory 30-minute break for truck drivers after 8-hours of continuous driving; and

·       Reinstating the option for splitting up the required 10-hour off-duty rest break for drivers operating trucks that are equipped with a sleeper-berth compartment.

In addition, the ANPRM seeks public comment and relevant data on two recently submitted petitions requesting regulatory relief from HOS rules (1) pertaining to the 14-hour on-duty limitation (filed by the Owner-Operators Independent Drivers Association) and (2) pertaining to the 10-hour off-duty requirement (filed by TruckerNation).

 

Earlier this year, the congressionally mandated electronic logging device (ELD) rule, which required most FMCSA-regulated motor carriers to convert their records from paper to an electronic format, became effective. While compliance with the ELD rule has reached nearly 99 percent across the trucking industry, it has also brought focus to HOS regulations, especially with regard to certain regulations having a significant impact on agriculture and other sectors of trucking.

 

Additional information on the ANPRM, including how to submit comments to the Federal Register docket, is available at https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-service-advanced-notice-proposed-rulemaking

 

The first in a series of public listening sessions on the ANPRM will take place Friday, August 24, 2018, in Dallas, Texas, at the Kay Bailey Hutchinson Convention Center beginning at 3:00 p.m. local time.  Further information is available at https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/event/public-listening-session-hours-service.

 

Information on current HOS regulations is available at https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-service/summary-hours-service-regulations.

 

Information on electronic logging devices (ELDs) carried on-board long-haul trucks and used by commercial vehicle enforcement officers to check compliance with HOS regulations is available at https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/hours-service/elds/electronic-logging-devices.

 

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Stay connected with FMCSA and USDOT via:

 

FMCSA.dot.gov | FMCSA on Facebook | FMCSA on Twitter

Daimler recalls more than 45,000 Cascadia tractors over instrument panel issue

Daimler Trucks North America is recalling more than 45,000 Freightliner Cascadia tractors for an issue with the ignition control unit not performing required bulb checks on the instrument panel in certain situations, according to documents from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

 

Daimler says if the ignition in the affected trucks is turned from on to off to on too quickly, the ICU may not perform the required bulb checks for the anti-lock brake system or electronic stability control, as required by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards.

Senate files bill to allow under-21 truckers to drive interstate

A bill that would allow CDL holders under the age of 21 to cross state lines has been filed in the U.S. Senate. The Drive-Safe Act, which was also filed in the U.S. House in March, would institute extra training hurdles and require 18-20-year-old drivers to log hundreds of hours behind the wheel alongside a more experienced driver before being permitted to operate interstate. The bill is backed by the American Trucking Associations.

 

Currently, federal law prohibits interstate operations to drivers 21 years and older. However, proponents of allowing younger drivers to cross state lines argue that, in large states, drivers can operate on trips hundreds of miles long, yet can’t make much shorter trips across multiple states. They also argue that nabbing drivers at an earlier age — 18 or 19 instead of 21 — could expand the industry’s ability to attract career truck operators.

Read more

Brake maintenance can’t be stressed enough

I can’t recall exactly how many times I have used this space to talk about the importance of brake maintenance, but I know it is a subject I have returned to on more than one occasion.

 

I need to do it again now because of the recent announcement from the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) regarding the designation of Sept. 16-22 as the days for its annual Brake Safety Week. This year CVSA is once again devoting a whole week to the brakes issue; last year it had cut back the inspection blitz to just one day. I don’t know why they chose to return to a weeklong blitz, but I, for one, think it’s very important that we should focus extra attention on brake maintenance for a full week each year.

Read more

EXTENDED ROAD CLOSURE ON NH ROUTE 127 IN HOPKINTON

TEN WEEK DETOUR IN PLACE DURING WORK ON HYDROELECTIC FACILITY

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation announces the planned extended closure to through traffic of a section of NH Route 127 in Hopkinton for approximately ten weeks. 

Beginning Monday, August 27, 2018, Route 127 (Maple Street) will be closed immediately east of the Rowell Covered Bridge to allow for upgrades to the nearby hydroelectric facility.  These upgrades to a section of penstock will require excavation of the roadway.

During this construction work, a detour will be in place utilizing Interstate 89 and US Route 202. The only section of NH 127 being closed is the area of the penstock, downstream of the Hopkinton-Everett Reservoir.  Route 127 will still be accessible from both sides, but will not allow for through traffic.

Here’s our list of truck driver safety pointers perfect for both drivers new to their vehicles and savvy pros looking for a quick refresher.

Neil Nogues, YRC Freight, the 2018 NHMTA State Champion came home with the highly-coveted Neill Darmstadter Professional Excellence Award.

 The Neill Darmstadter Professional Excellence Award is sponsored by C.H. Robinson and recognizes a driver judged to best exemplify the characteristics of a professional truck driver. The criteria is based on their driving record, skill, knowledge, Photo courtesy Mickey Rafealattitude toward safety, and personality as evidenced by their work history and performance in various NTDC skills tests and overall professionalism. Contestants for the award must have competed at seven or more National Truck Driving Championships.

Three other drivers, one from New Hampshire and two from Vermont placed in the top five of their class.

From New Hampshire:

Paul Robichaud, Fed Ex Express, 4th Place Tanks

From Vermont:

Matt Smith, Fed Ex Express, 4th Place Twins

Chris Goddard, Fed Ex Express, 5th Place 3 Axel

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL!

7 Truck Driving Tips

Here’s our list of truck driver safety pointers perfect for both drivers new to their vehicles and savvy pros looking for a quick refresher.

1. Watch your blind spots

Other motorists may not be aware of a truck’s “no zones” — those where crashes are most likely to occur. Common “no zones” include:

·       Off to the side just in front of the cab

·       Just behind the side mirrors

·       Directly behind the truck

If others aren’t aware of these trouble spots, they may drive dangerously close. As frustrating as this can be, it’s up to you to exercise caution before turning or changing lanes and to maintain a safe distance.

2. Reduce speed in work zones

Roughly one-third of all fatal work-zone accidents involve large trucks. Make sure to take your time going through interstate construction — your delivery can always wait.

3. Maintain your truck

Give your vehicle a thorough check each morning (fluid levels, horn, mirrors, etc.). The brakes are particularly vital, given how much weight is riding on them. If you spot anything unusual, report it to dispatch before attempting to drive.

4. Load cargo wisely

The higher you stack cargo, the more drag on the truck. By stacking lower and spreading cargo through the full space of the truck, you can stay more nimble and improve your fuel economy.

5. Reduce speed on curves

Usually, following the speed limit is a good thing. When it comes to trucking, however, there are times when even adhering to posted signs is still too fast (confusing, we know).

Particularly on exit/entrance ramps, the speed limits are meant more for cars; trucks have a tendency to tip over if they take the curves too fast. When going through any curve, it’s best to set your speed far lower than the posted limit to make up for your rig’s unique dimensions.

6. Adjust for bad weather

Inclement weather causes roughly 25 percent of all speeding-related truck driving accidents. Cut your speed down by one-third on wet roads, and by one-half on snowy or icy ones.

Also allow more time for maneuvers in poor weather. Let your blinker run for a good 5 blinks before your change lanes, and signal for turns before slowing down.

And if you see other truckers pulling over, maybe it’s best you do likewise.

7. Take care of yourself

A big part of truck driver safety has less to do with your vehicle, and more to do with you. Getting enough sleep, eating right, exercising, and taking quality home time will all help you feel more content and refreshed behind the wheel — 2 qualities prized in any driver.