NH Toll Increase


Dear NHMTA Member:

As most of you know by now, there is a proposal to raise tolls on the Turnpike system by a substantial amount. According to the New Hampshire Department of Transportation, this toll proposal will generate an additional $36 million in revenue for the “acceleration and expansion of Turnpike capital projects.” Attached is the seven-page toll proposal that was prepared by the New Hampshire Department of Transportation for your review.

Toll rates are set by the New Hampshire Executive Council, unlike the “gas tax” which is debated and voted on by the New Hampshire General Court (NH House & Senate). If the toll rate increase is approved by the executive councilors, the majority of the toll transactions in the state of New Hampshire will increase by 50%. The commercial motor vehicle rate will become twice the class-one passenger rate, which is displayed on a graph in the proposal.

Herein lies the problem: There are five executive councilors and it takes only three to approve a toll increase. Executive Councilors Papas, Volinsky, and Prescott are all in support of this massive toll increase.

If you are opposed to this increase, I am recommending the following course of action: It is extremely important that the executive councilors and the governor hear from you as soon as possible. Their contact information is found on a separate sheet, attached.

Additionally, a public hearing has been scheduled for Monday night, December 4, 2017, at 6:00 pm at the Portsmouth Public Library for the purpose of public input on this toll proposal which I hope you will attend. Here is the address of the venue:
Portsmouth Public Library
175 Parrott Ave
Portsmouth, NH 03801

Unless you are in favor of an increase in tolls, it is critically important that you show up at this meeting to voice your opposition. I am very afraid that there will be many in the room that will be in support of this proposed increase.

Please make phone calls if you can as I have found that they can be the most effective form of communication. E-mail addresses are provided if you do not have the opportunity to call.

Here are a few talking points that you can use:

The New Hampshire Turnpike system is fully funded. There is enough cash to pay for current projects.

The state raised the gas tax 4.5 cents per gallon only three years ago. This generated approximately $32 million in new funds that are dedicated for use on New Hampshire’s roads and bridges.

This is important because the toll increase proposal is intended for the state to purchase a part of the highway through Concord (between Exits 14 to north of Exit 15) making it part of the turnpike system. As part of that transaction, according to NH DOT, that would free up $180,000,000 to be used on non-turnpike system roads and bridges.

That discussion should be part of a legislative hearing with multiple opportunities for public input.
Please, let the executive councilors know of the direct-cost impact to your business on a monthly and annual basis, i.e., the expected cost increase of goods and services to your customers and the impact on your employees.

Please let me know if you plan to attend the hearing on Monday evening in Portsmouth. It would be great if you can attend. Also, please provide me with any feedback that you receive from the executive councilors.

Sincerely,

Robert J. Sculley
President
New Hampshire Motor Transport Association
P O Box 3898
Concord NH 03302
603-224-7337 Fax 603-225-9361
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2017 11 28 New Hampshire Executive Councilors

2017 11 28 Proposal for Acceleration and Expansion of Turnpike

Should we call it Trucksgiving?

More than 70 percent of all freight tonnage moved in the U.S. goes on trucks, according to the American Trucking Associations.

Moving 10.5 billion tons of freight each year requires more than 3.4 million trucks and about 3.5 million truck drivers. But if you plan to celebrate in the traditional style tomorrow, you have to give a nod to the real heroes of Thanksgiving: turkeys and truckers.

When Americans sit down to enjoy their Thanksgiving feast we will consume a whopping 44 million turkeys. Personally, I will account for one 15-pounder.
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NIGHT WORK ON I-93 BETWEEN EXITS 4 AND 5 IN LONDONDERRY

I-93 NORTHBOUND LANE CLOSURE FOR PAVEMENT MARKING

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT) announces traffic impacts for planned night work associated with the I-93 expansion between Exits 4 and 5 in Londonderry.

Weather permitting, pavement marking work for a new traffic pattern will take place during nighttime hours from Monday, November 20th into Tuesday, November 21st. The work is scheduled to be done between the hours of 8:00 pm and 5:30 am and will require the use of lane closures. Message boards and smart work zone devices will be used to notify the traveling public.

Traffic on I-93 northbound between mile markers 12.6 and 15.8 will be reduced to one lane. Motorists should remain alert while traveling through the construction zone and obey all posted signs.

This work is part of the $35 million I-93 widening and reconstruction project between Exit 4 in Derry and Exit 5 in Londonderry. The general contractor is Weaver Brothers Construction from Bow, New Hampshire.

Thanksgiving Holiday Cargo Theft Trends and Security Tips

JERSEY CITY, N.J. — Don’t let thieves ruin your Thanksgiving holiday. CargoNet examined theft trends from Thanksgiving week for 2012 to 2016 and determined that 163 cargo and trucking vehicle thefts were recorded in this period. The good news is that, after 2012, CargoNet data showed that theft activity slowed significantly. Forty-five thefts were reported in 2012 compared with 31, 30, 26, and 31 in 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016, respectively. Of the 163 cargo and trucking vehicle thefts reported in this analysis, 119 involved theft of cargo.

In the 2012–2016 analysis, which runs Tuesday to Monday for Thanksgiving week, 86 semi-tractors and 107 semi-trailers were stolen. The estimated loss value for stolen cargo was $8.85 million. On average, each cargo theft was worth $132,929.69. If we apply that average across all 119 cargo theft incidents, the total estimated loss value becomes $15.8 million.

Reported theft was highest on Wednesday, with 30 reported thefts. Nineteen thefts were confirmed to have happened on Thanksgiving Day.

Thieves in Texas logged the most holiday working hours: 35 thefts were reported in Texas. In Texas, thieves were most active in Dallas (10 incidents) and other cities in the Dallas–Fort Worth area (8 incidents). CargoNet recorded 26 thefts in California. Thefts were most common in Los Angeles County (8 thefts) and San Bernardino County (7 thefts). Thefts were also recorded in Alameda, Kern, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Ventura Counties. Texas and California were followed by Florida (19 incidents), Georgia (12 incidents), and Ontario, Canada (10 incidents).

Perhaps surprisingly, no turkeys were reported stolen in this analysis, but cargo thieves did prefer stealing food and beverage items more than any other commodity, with 33 reported cargo thefts. Specifically, cargo thieves most often targeted alcoholic beverages as well as nonalcoholic beverages, such as soda and energy drinks. Thefts of electronics, metals, and household goods trailed with 15, 12, and 11 thefts, respectively. CargoNet recorded $3.3 million in stolen apparel and accessories freight, making this the costliest loss by commodity category.

View the Thanksgiving Cargo Theft Trends Infographic and Security Tips Now!

ELD violations won’t ding carriers’ CSA scores until April

FMCSA announces
Carriers who are hit with citations for non-compliance with FMCSA’s electronic logging device mandate will not have points recorded against them in the Compliance, Safety, Accountability carrier scoring system, safety officials said today at a public hearing in Birmingham, Ala. It was previously announced that those drivers also will not be put out of service during that period.
A driver found after the mandate’s implementation, Dec. 18, but before April 1, with no ELD or compliant AOBRD (automatic onboard recording device) will be cited for having no log, but it will have no impact on the associated motor carrier’s Safety Measurement System ranking, said Jon Dierberger, FMCSA field administrator.
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